Scenes from the Snow-Fields with 12 Chomolithographs

$13,000

Product No. coleman

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Scenes from the Snow-Fields; being Illustrations of the Upper Ice-World of Mont Blanc, from Sketches Made on the Spot in the Years 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858; with Historical and Descriptive Remarks, and a Comparison of the Chamonix and St. Gervais Routes

This impressive volume 12 folio color chromolithographs is Edmund Thomas Coleman’s Scenes from the Snow-Fields; being Illustrations of the Upper Ice-World of Mont Blanc, from Sketches Made on the Spot in the Years 1855, 1856, 1857, 1858; with Historical and Descriptive Remarks, and a Comparison of the Chamonix and St. Gervais Routes. The work was published in London by Longman, Brown, Green, Longman, and Roberts in 1859. It is one of the most rare and sought after mountaineering books.

The stunning views were lithographed and printed in color by Vincent Brookes. The work is bound in publisher’s cloth and rebacked with leather corners. There is a title, dedication, 47 pages, and 12 chromolithographs.

Brookes created the lithographs after Coleman’s original paintings done in the field. Coleman was an aritst and mountaineer. He climbed in the Alps and Cascades. The Coleman Glacier is named after him. He wrote in the preface that he sought to convey the views as “experienced by Alpine travellers… those more extraordinary combinations which are only to be met with above the level of perpetual snow.”

The plates included are the following: 1. View from the Forest of the Peregrines, showing the Montagne de la Cote (De Saussure’s route), with the Glacier des Bossons and the Aiguille and Dome du Goute. 2. View on the Glacier des Bossons. 3. Icebergs on the Glacier des Bossons, looking towards the valley. 4. The Glacier du Tacconay. 5. The Region of Seracs. 6. View from the Grands Mulets, looking towards the mountain; the Cabin in the foreground. 7. View from the Grands Mulets, looking over the valley; the reverse of the above. Twilight. 8. The Grand Plateau. Sunrise. 9. A great Crevasse at the foot of the Rochers Rouges. 10. The Mur de la Cote, looking towards Mont Maudit / The Mur de la Cote, looking over the Brenva / The Corridor, with the Mur de la Cote / The Calotte, or upper portion of the Dome of Mont Blanc. 11. The passage of the Couloir, on the Aiguille du Goute / Ice-Cliff on the Dome du Goute / View from the Tete-Rouge / View from the Cabin of M. Guichard, the Aiguille in the background. 12. The junction of the two routes on the Grand Plateau / The Cabin on the summit of the Aiguille du Goute.

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